Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/31210
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: The importance of accurate anatomic assessment for the volumetric analysis of the amygdala
Author: Bonilha, L.
Kobayashi, E.
Cendes, F.
Li, L.M.
Abstract: There is a wide range of values reported in volumetric studies of the amygdala. The use of single plane thick magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may prevent the correct visualization of anatomic landmarks and yield imprecise results. To assess whether there is a difference between volumetric analysis of the amygdala performed with single plane MRI 3-mm slices and with multiplanar analysis of MRI 1-mm slices, we studied healthy subjects and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. We performed manual delineation of the amygdala on T1-weighted inversion recovery, 3-mm coronal slices and manual delineation of the amygdala on three-dimensional volumetric T1-weighted images with 1-mm slice thickness. The data were compared using a dependent t-test. There was a significant difference between the volumes obtained by the coronal plane-based measurements and the volumes obtained by three-dimensional analysis (P < 0.001). An incorrect estimate of the amygdala volume may preclude a correct analysis of the biological effects of alterations in amygdala volume. Three-dimensional analysis is preferred because it is based on more extensive anatomical assessment and the results are similar to those obtained in post-mortem studies.
Subject: Amygdala
Magnetic resonance
Volumetry
Epilepsy
Temporal lobe
Editor: Associação Brasileira de Divulgação Científica
Rights: aberto
Identifier DOI: 10.1590/S0100-879X2005000300012
Address: http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0100-879X2005000300012
http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0100-879X2005000300012
Date Issue: 1-Mar-2005
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

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