Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/242021
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Subirrigation: Historical Overview, Challenges, And Future Prospects
Author: Ferrarezi
Rhuanito Soranz; Weaver
Geoffrey Matthew; van IerseI
Marc W.; Testezlaf
Roberto
Abstract: Subirrigation is a greenhouse irrigation method that relies on capillary action to provide plants with water and nutrients from below their containers. The first documented subirrigation system was described in 1895, and several variations on the basic design were used for research purposes before the modern ebb-and-flow type systems emerged in 1974. Most subirrigation systems apply the fertilizer solution to a waterproof bench or greenhouse section, allowing the substrate to absorb the water through holes in the bottom of the containers. Because there is little or no leaching, subirrigation typically allows for the use of lower fertilizer solution concentrations. Although excess fertilizer salts typically accumulate in the top layer of the substrate, this does not seem to have a negative impact on plants. Subirrigation can conserve nutrients and water, reduce labor costs, and help growers meet environmental regulations. A challenge with subirrigation is the potential spread of pathogens via the fertilizer solution. When this is a concern, effective disinfection methods such as ultraviolet radiation, chlorine, or ozone should be used. Sensor-based irrigation control has recently been applied to subirrigation to further improve nutrient and water use efficiencies. Better control of irrigation may help reduce the spread of pathogens, while at the same time improving crop quality. The primary economic benefit of subirrigation is the reduction in labor costs, which is the greatest expenditure for many growers.
Subject: Nutrient Solution Concentration
Concentration Affects Growth
Loop Substrate Culture
New-guinea Impatiens
Water-use Efficiency
Flow Wick Culture
Fertilizer Concentration
Irrigation Method
Electrical-conductivity
Drip-irrigation
Country: ALEXANDRIA
Editor: AMER SOC HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 
Address: http://horttech.ashspublications.org/content/25/3/262.abstract
Date Issue: 2015
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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