Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/241788
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Drift Fences In Traps: Theoretical Evidence Of Effectiveness Of The Two Most Common Arrays Applied To Terrestrial Tetrapods
Author: Mendes
Daniel Mincauscaste; Leao
Rafael de Freitas; Toledo
Luis Felipe
Abstract: Biodiversity inventories are well acknowledged as key to conservation planning. One widely used method for sampling terrestrial fauna is traps with drift fences. Such drift fences, however, may be configured in several arrays, varying the height, length of the fence, space between conjugated traps (e.g., buckets or funnels), and it can be arranged in linear (I) or radial (Y) formats. Consequently, some criticism arose questioning which drift fence arrangement should be employed. Therefore, we made use of geometrical models to test the probability of capturing terrestrial tetrapods (as model organisms) using traps associated along with both I and Y drift fence arrays. With distances varying from 8 to 100 m from the fence, the capturing rate of the I format was in average 1.16 times higher than the Y format. Besides this, we also present data that may enable field ecologists to better decide the minimum distance between two traps with drift fences, ensuring accurate statistics. Correct decisions in ecological and management studies may prevent wastes and fundament efficient conservation policies. (C) 2015 Associacao Brasileira de Ciencia Ecologica e Conservacao. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.
Subject: Pitfall Traps
Dwelling Arthropods
Size
Herpetofauna
Amphibians
Movement
Forests
Age
Country: RIO DE JANEIRO
Editor: ASSOC BRASILEIRA CIENCIA ECOLOGICA E CONSERVACAO
Rights: aberto
Identifier DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.05.002
Address: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1679007315000146
Date Issue: 2015
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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