Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/235768
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Splenectomy Attenuates Obesity And Decreases Insulin Hypersecretion In Hypothalamic Obese Rats.
Author: Leite, Nayara de Carvalho
Montes, Elisangela Gueiber
Fisher, Stefani Valéria
Cancian, Cláudia Regina Capriglioni
de Oliveira, Júlio Cezar
Martins-Pinge, Marli Cardoso
Kanunfre, Carla Cristine
Souza, Kleber Luiz Araujo
Grassiolli, Sabrina
Abstract: Obesity-induced abnormalities, such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension, are frequently correlated with low-grade inflammation, a process that may depend on normal spleen function. This study investigated the role of the spleen in the obesity induced by monosodium glutamate (MSG) treatment. MSG-obese and lean control (CON) rats were subjected to splenectomy (SPL) or non-operated (NO). MSG-NO rats presented a high adipose tissue content, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and islet hypersecretion, accompanied by hypertrophy of both pancreatic islets and adipocytes when compared with CON-NO rats. In addition, changes in nitric oxide response were found in islets from the MSG-NO group without associated alterations in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) or IL1β expression. MSG-NO also presented increased leukocyte counts and augmented LPS-induced nitric oxide production in macrophages. Splenectomy of MSG-obese animals decreased insulin hypersecretion, normalized the nitric oxide response in the pancreatic islets, improved insulin sensitivity and reduced hypertrophy of both adipocytes and islets, when compared with MSG-NO rats. Results show that splenectomy attenuates the progression of the obesity modulating pancreas functions in MSG-obese rats.
Subject: Insulin
Islets
Obesity
Spleen
Rights: embargo
Identifier DOI: 10.1016/j.metabol.2015.05.003
Address: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26026366
Date Issue: 2015
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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