Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/235589
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Cortical Correlates Of Affective Syndrome In Dementia Due To Alzheimer's Disease.
Author: Hayata, Thaís T
Bergo, Felipe P G
Rezende, Thiago J
Damasceno, Alfredo
Damasceno, Benito P
Cendes, Fernando
Stella, Florindo
Balthazar, Marcio L F
Abstract: Neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are prevalent, however their relationship with patterns of cortical atrophy is not fully known. Objectives To compare cortical atrophy's patterns between AD patients and healthy controls; to verify correlations between neuropsychiatric syndromes and cortical atrophy. Method 33 AD patients were examined by Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Patients and 29 controls underwent a 3T MRI scanning. We considered four NPI syndromes: affective, apathy, hyperactivity and psychosis. Correlations between structural imaging and neuropsychiatric scores were performed by Freesurfer. Results were significant with a p-value < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons. Results Patients exhibited atrophy in entorhinal cortices, left inferior and middle temporal gyri, and precuneus bilaterally. There was correlation between affective syndrome and cortical thickness in right frontal structures, insula and temporal pole. Conclusion Cortical thickness measures revealed atrophy in mild AD. Depression and anxiety symptoms were associated with atrophy of right frontal, temporal and insular cortices.
Subject: Aged
Aged, 80 And Over
Alzheimer Disease
Anxiety
Atrophy
Case-control Studies
Cerebral Cortex
Depression
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders
Neuropsychological Tests
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Reference Values
Syndrome
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1590/0004-282X20150068
Address: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=26200048
Date Issue: 2015
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

Files in This Item:
File SizeFormat 
pmed_26200048.pdf430.76 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.