Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/235454
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Pleistocene Megafaunal Interaction Networks Became More Vulnerable After Human Arrival.
Author: Pires, Mathias M
Koch, Paul L
Fariña, Richard A
de Aguiar, Marcus A M
dos Reis, Sérgio F
Guimarães, Paulo R
Abstract: The end of the Pleistocene was marked by the extinction of almost all large land mammals worldwide except in Africa. Although the debate on Pleistocene extinctions has focused on the roles of climate change and humans, the impact of perturbations depends on properties of ecological communities, such as species composition and the organization of ecological interactions. Here, we combined palaeoecological and ecological data, food-web models and community stability analysis to investigate if differences between Pleistocene and modern mammalian assemblages help us understand why the megafauna died out in the Americas while persisting in Africa. We show Pleistocene and modern assemblages share similar network topology, but differences in richness and body size distributions made Pleistocene communities significantly more vulnerable to the effects of human arrival. The structural changes promoted by humans in Pleistocene networks would have increased the likelihood of unstable dynamics, which may favour extinction cascades in communities facing extrinsic perturbations. Our findings suggest that the basic aspects of the organization of ecological communities may have played an important role in major extinction events in the past. Knowledge of community-level properties and their consequences to dynamics may be critical to understand past and future extinctions.
Subject: Collapse
Community Stability
Extinction
Mammals
Citation: Proceedings. Biological Sciences / The Royal Society. v. 282, n. 1814, 2015-Sep.
Rights: embargo
Identifier DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2015.1367
Address: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=26336175
Date Issue: 2015
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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