Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/235133
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Progressive Frontal Morphology Changes During The First Year Of A Modified Pi Procedure For Scaphocephaly.
Author: Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo
Denadai, Rafael
Takata, João Paulo Issamu
Ghizoni, Enrico
Buzzo, Celso Luiz
Raposo-Amaral, Cesar Augusto
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to quantify the changes in frontal morphology in patients with scaphocephaly treated with a modified Pi procedure. Consecutive scaphocephalic patients (n = 13) who underwent surgery before 12 months of age that had more than 1 year of follow-up and standard preoperative, 3-month, and 1-year photographs were included. Anthropometric measurements were used to document the craniofacial index. Computerized photogrammetric analyses of five craniofacial angles (bossing angle, nasofrontal angle, angle of facial convexity, and angle of total facial convexity) were also performed. Comparisons of the preoperative and postoperative direct anthropometric measurements of the cephalic index showed a significant (all p < 0.05) increase in the postoperative period, with no significant differences in early versus late postoperative period comparisons. Comparisons of the preoperative and postoperative computerized photogrammetric measurements of the craniofacial angles showed a significant (all p < 0.05) reduction (bossing angle, angle of facial convexity, and angle of total facial convexity) and increase (nasofrontal angle) in the early and late postoperative periods. Frontal morphology significantly changed over the first year of the modified Pi procedure.
Subject: Frontal Morphology
Pi Procedure
Sagittal Synostosis
Scaphocephaly
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1007/s00381-015-2914-0
Address: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26409882
Date Issue: 2016
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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