Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/2237
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: The use of vancomycin-loaded poly-l-lactic acid and poly-ethylene oxide microspheres for bone repair: An in vivo study
Author: Coraca-Huber, Debora Cristina
de Rezende Duek, Eliana Aparecida
Etchebehere, Mauricio
Magna, Luis Alberto
Ingrid Amstalden, Eliane Maria
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate bone repair after the implantation of vancomycin-loaded poly-L-lactic acid/poly-ethylene oxide microspheres compared with vancomycin-unloaded poly-L-lactic acid/poly-ethylene oxide microspheres. METHODS: Poly-L-lactic acid/poly-ethylene oxide microspheres were implanted in rat tibiae and evaluated for periods of 2, 4, 8, and 12 days and 4, 8, 16, and 32 weeks. The groups implanted with vancomycin-loaded and vancomycin-unloaded microspheres were compared. Histopathologic (semi-quantitative) and histomorphometric analyses were performed to evaluate the bone formation process. RESULTS: During the first period (second day), fibrin and hemorrhaging areas were observed to be replaced by granulation tissue around the microspheres. Woven bone formation with progressive maturation was observed. All of the histopathological findings, evaluated by a semi-quantitative assay and a quantitative analysis (percentage of bone formation), were similar between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Vancomycin-loaded poly-L-lactic acid/poly-ethylene oxide microspheres are a good bone substitute candidate for bone repair. Local antibiotic therapy using vancomycin-loaded poly-L-lactic acid/poly-ethylene oxide microspheres should be considered after the microbiological evaluation of its efficacy.
Subject: Poly-L-lactic acid
Poly-ethylene oxide
Vancomycin
Bone grafting
Country: Brazil
Editor: Hospital Clinicas, Univ Sao Paulo
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.6061/clinics/2012(07)15
Date Issue: 2012
Appears in Collections:FCM - Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.