Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/21612
Type: Artigo
Title: Effect of sequential cold shocks on survival and molting rate in Triatoma infestans Klug
Author: Campos, Silvana GP
Rodrigues, Vera Lúcia CC
Wada, C. Y.
Mello, Maria Luiza S.
Abstract: The survival and molting incidence in Triatoma infestans, a vector of Chagas disease, were investigated following sequential shocks at 0ºC in fifth instar nymphs under moderate fasting and full nutritional conditions. The shocks were separated by intervals of 8 h and 24 h at 30ºC. The results indicated that in terms of insect survival, T. infestans is tolerant to a single cold shock at 0ºC even for 12 h, or to sequential cold shocks, regardless of the nutritional state of the specimens. In terms of molting rate, fasting enhanced the tolerance to sequential cold shocks, but did not exceed the tolerance acquired by fully-nourished specimens, except when cold shocks were separated by an 8 h interval at 30ºC. The protective action elicited by fasting was assumed to be additive to that induced by a single mild cold shock or sequential cold shocks. The cold-tolerance response of T. infestans may have favoured its survival in areas of South America with low temperatures, even considering that this species is predominantly associated with human habitats.
The survival and molting incidence in Triatoma infestans, a vector of Chagas disease, were investigated following sequential shocks at 0ºC in fifth instar nymphs under moderate fasting and full nutritional conditions. The shocks were separated by intervals of 8 h and 24 h at 30ºC. The results indicated that in terms of insect survival, T. infestans is tolerant to a single cold shock at 0ºC even for 12 h, or to sequential cold shocks, regardless of the nutritional state of the specimens. In terms of molting rate, fasting enhanced the tolerance to sequential cold shocks, but did not exceed the tolerance acquired by fully-nourished specimens, except when cold shocks were separated by an 8 h interval at 30ºC. The protective action elicited by fasting was assumed to be additive to that induced by a single mild cold shock or sequential cold shocks. The cold-tolerance response of T. infestans may have favoured its survival in areas of South America with low temperatures, even considering that this species is predominantly associated with human habitats.
The survival and molting incidence in Triatoma infestans, a vector of Chagas disease, were investigated following sequential shocks at 0ºC in fifth instar nymphs under moderate fasting and full nutritional conditions. The shocks were separated by intervals of 8 h and 24 h at 30ºC. The results indicated that in terms of insect survival, T. infestans is tolerant to a single cold shock at 0ºC even for 12 h, or to sequential cold shocks, regardless of the nutritional state of the specimens. In terms of molting rate, fasting enhanced the tolerance to sequential cold shocks, but did not exceed the tolerance acquired by fully-nourished specimens, except when cold shocks were separated by an 8 h interval at 30ºC. The protective action elicited by fasting was assumed to be additive to that induced by a single mild cold shock or sequential cold shocks. The cold-tolerance response of T. infestans may have favoured its survival in areas of South America with low temperatures, even considering that this species is predominantly associated with human habitats.
Subject: Muda
Triatoma infestans
Inseto - Nutrição
Resposta ao choque frio
Ninfa (Inseto)
Sobrevivência
Country: Brasil
Editor: FIOCRUZ
Citation: Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Ministério da Saúde, v. 97, n. 4, p. 579-582, 2002.
Rights: aberto
Identifier DOI: 10.1590/S0074-02762002000400024
Address: http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0074-02762002000400024
Date Issue: 2002
Appears in Collections:IB - Artigos e Outros Documentos
IMECC - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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