Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/2110
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Allergenicity of Bos d 5 in Children with Cow's Milk Allergy is Reduced by Transglutaminase Polymerization
Author: Olivier, Celso Eduardo
Villas-Boas, Mariana Battaglin
Netto, Flavia Maria
Zollner, Ricardo de Lima
Abstract: Background: Cow's milk allergy in pediatric patients is an unresolved issue. Among the proteins in milk, bovine whey beta-lactoglobulin (Bos d 5) is the most commonly allergenic. Allergenicity to native cow's milk proteins in humans is a well-studied issue, but very little is known about the allergenicity of cross-linked proteins found in bioprocessed dairy products. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the allergenicity of polymerized bovine whey beta-lactoglobulin in symptomatic children diagnosed with IgE-mediated Bos d 5 hypersensitivity. Methods: Side-by-side skin prick tests with native and polymerized bovine whey beta-lactoglobulin were performed in 22 symptomatic children allergic to cow's milk with detectable specific IgE to Bos d 5 by CAP Systems Pharmacia. A matched control group tolerant to cow's milk and undetectable specific IgE to Bos d 5 was established for comparison. Wheal mean diameter was compared between the native and polymerized groups by paired t-tests. Results: The mean difference in wheal mean diameter observed between native versus polymerized bovine whey beta-lactoglobulin in the paired skin prick test of the allergic group was 2.27 mm (p = 0.02; 95% CI 0.38-4.16). Conclusions: The skin prick test showed a significant reduction in the allergenicity of polymerized compared with native bovine whey beta-lactoglobulin in children with IgE-mediated Bos d 5 hypersensitivity.
Editor: Mary Ann Liebert Inc
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1089/ped.2011.0101
Date Issue: 2012
Appears in Collections:FCM - Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas

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