Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/2108
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Predictive Factors of Failure in a Fixed 15 mCi I-131-Iodide Therapy for Graves' Disease
Author: Moura-Neto, Arnaldo
Mosci, Camila
Santos, Allan O.
Amorim, Barbara J.
de Lima, Mariana C. L.
Etchebehere, Elba C. S. C.
Tambascia, Marcos Antonio
Ramos, Celso Dario
Zantut-Wittmann, Denise Engelbrecht
Abstract: Purpose: To investigate the factors influencing the success rate in a fixed, 15 mCi approach for treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism. Material and Methods: The thyroid function outcome ( hyperthyroidism or euthyroidism/hypothyroidism) was verified at least 1 year after radioiodine therapy (RIT) retrospectively and compared with presenting clinical characteristics and pre-RIT parameters in 87 patients treated with I-131-iodide for Graves' disease in a tertiary care center. Results: After RIT, 16 patients (18.4%) became euthyroid, 54 patients (62.1%) became hypothyroid, and 17 (19.5%) remained hyperthyroid. We found no statistically significant association between thyroid function outcome and gender (P = 0.50), ophthalmopathy (P = 0.69), drug used (methimazole or propylthiouracil; P = 1.00), maintenance or withdrawal of thionamides pre-RIT (P = 0.98), or Tc-99m sodium pertechnetate thyroid uptake prior to RIT (P = 0.75). The only variable associated with the success rate was thyroid mass <62 g (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Our study has shown that a fixed 15 mCi approach for treatment of Graves' disease was effective, but high failure rates were observed in patients presenting larger goiters, particularly those with estimated thyroid mass >62 g.
Subject: radioiodine therapy
Graves' disease
Tc-99m sodium pertechnetate thyroid uptake
autoimmune hyperthyroidism
thyroid mass
Editor: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1097/RLU.0b013e31824851d1
Date Issue: 2012
Appears in Collections:FCM - Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas

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