Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/201135
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Early Detection Of Metabolic And Energy Disorders By Thermal Time Series Stochastic Complexity Analysis.
Author: Lutaif, N A
Palazzo, R
Gontijo, J A R
Abstract: Maintenance of thermal homeostasis in rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) is associated with changes in their thermal balance. The thermodynamic relationship between heat dissipation and energy storage is altered by the ingestion of high-energy diet content. Observation of thermal registers of core temperature behavior, in humans and rodents, permits identification of some characteristics of time series, such as autoreference and stationarity that fit adequately to a stochastic analysis. To identify this change, we used, for the first time, a stochastic autoregressive model, the concepts of which match those associated with physiological systems involved and applied in male HFD rats compared with their appropriate standard food intake age-matched male controls (n=7 per group). By analyzing a recorded temperature time series, we were able to identify when thermal homeostasis would be affected by a new diet. The autoregressive time series model (AR model) was used to predict the occurrence of thermal homeostasis, and this model proved to be very effective in distinguishing such a physiological disorder. Thus, we infer from the results of our study that maximum entropy distribution as a means for stochastic characterization of temperature time series registers may be established as an important and early tool to aid in the diagnosis and prevention of metabolic diseases due to their ability to detect small variations in thermal profile.
Rights: aberto
Identifier DOI: 10.1590/1414-431X20133097
Address: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24519093
Date Issue: 2014
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

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