Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/200582
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Hearing Preservation After Cochlear Implantation: Unicamp Outcomes.
Author: de Carvalho, Guilherme Machado
Guimaraes, Alexandre C
Duarte, Alexandre S M
Muranaka, Eder B
Soki, Marcelo N
Martins, Renata S Zanotello
Bianchini, Walter A
Paschoal, Jorge R
Castilho, Arthur M
Abstract: Background. Electric-acoustic stimulation (EAS) is an excellent choice for people with residual hearing in low frequencies but not high frequencies and who derive insufficient benefit from hearing aids. For EAS to be effective, subjects' residual hearing must be preserved during cochlear implant (CI) surgery. Methods. We implanted 6 subjects with a CI. We used a special surgical technique and an electrode designed to be atraumatic. Subjects' rates of residual hearing preservation were measured 3 times postoperatively, lastly after at least a year of implant experience. Subjects' aided speech perception was tested pre- and postoperatively with a sentence test in quiet. Subjects' subjective responses assessed after a year of EAS or CI experience. Results. 4 subjects had total or partial residual hearing preservation; 2 subjects had total residual hearing loss. All subjects' hearing and speech perception benefited from cochlear implantation. CI diminished or eliminated tinnitus in all 4 subjects who had it preoperatively. 5 subjects reported great satisfaction with their new device. Conclusions. When we have more experience with our surgical technique we are confident we will be able to report increased rates of residual hearing preservation. Hopefully, our study will raise the profile of EAS in Brazil and Latin/South America.
Rights: aberto
Identifier DOI: 10.1155/2013/107186
Address: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23573094
Date Issue: 2013
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

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