Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/200516
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Beneficial Effect Of Crotamine In The Treatment Of Myasthenic Rats.
Author: Hernandez-Oliveira e Silva, Saraguaci
Rostelato-Ferreira, Sandro
Rocha-e-Silva, Thomaz Augusto Alves
Randazzo-Moura, Priscila
Dal-Belo, Cháriston André
Sanchez, Eladio Flores
Borja-Oliveira, Caroline R
Rodrigues-Simioni, Léa
Abstract: Crotamine is a basic, low-molecular-weight peptide that, at low concentrations, improves neurotransmission in isolated neuromuscular preparations by modulating sodium channels. In this study, we compared the effects of crotamine and neostigmine on neuromuscular transmission in myasthenic rats. We used a conventional electromyographic technique in in-situ neuromuscular preparations and a 4-week treadmill program. During the in-situ electromyographic recording, neostigmine (17 μg/kg) caused short-term facilitation, whereas crotamine induced progressive and sustained twitch-tension enhancement during 140 min of recording (50 ± 5%, P < 0.05). On the treadmill evaluation, rats showed significant improvement in exercise tolerance, characterized by a decrease in the number of fatigue episodes after 2 weeks of a single-dose treatment with crotamine. These results indicate that crotamine is more efficient than neostigmine for enhancing muscular performance in myasthenic rats, possibly by improving the safety factor of neuromuscular transmission.
Subject: Animals
Cholinesterase Inhibitors
Crotalid Venoms
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
Electromyography
Exercise Tolerance
Hindlimb
Male
Muscle, Skeletal
Myasthenia Gravis, Autoimmune, Experimental
Neostigmine
Neuromuscular Junction
Rats
Rats, Inbred Lew
Synaptic Transmission
Treatment Outcome
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1002/mus.23714
Address: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23460475
Date Issue: 2013
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

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