Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/199977
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Male Fertility, Obesity, And Bariatric Surgery.
Author: Reis, Leonardo Oliveira
Dias, Fernando Goulart Fernandes
Abstract: Obesity has become a new worldwide health problem with significant impact not only on cardiovascular diseases but also on many other related disorders, highlighting infertility. Obesity may adversely affect male reproduction by endocrinologic, thermal, genetic, and sexual mechanisms. There is good evidence that obesity can be associated with reduced sperm concentrations, but studies about sperm motility, morphology, and DNA fragmentation have been less numerous and more conflicting. Although weight loss is the cornerstone of the treatment of obesity-related infertility, with promising results in restoring fertility and normal hormonal profiles, bariatric surgery impact on male fertility is still unclear and until now there is not enough data to support the informed consent in this scenario. Physicians are encouraged to highlight possible positive and/or negative impacts concerning male capacity of fertilization when informing patients. A balanced judgment and a personalized case-by-case management with patient involvement in decisions are fundamental in this setting and indication of cryopreservation of semen samples should be considered in selected circumstances. Well-structured trials controlled for confounders including female factors and based on solid outcomes (ie, birth rates) must urgently come up to clarify this emerging scenario.
Subject: Bariatric Surgery
Dna Fragmentation
Hormones
Humans
Infertility, Male
Male
Obesity
Semen Analysis
Sperm Count
Sperm Motility
Spermatozoa
Weight Loss
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1177/1933719112440053
Address: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22534334
Date Issue: 2012
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

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