Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/199496
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: A Meta-analysis Of Predation Risk Effects On Pollinator Behaviour.
Author: Romero, Gustavo Q
Antiqueira, Pablo A P
Koricheva, Julia
Abstract: Flower-visiting animals are constantly under predation risk when foraging and hence might be expected to evolve behavioural adaptations to avoid predators. We reviewed the available published and unpublished data to assess the overall effects of predators on pollinator behaviour and to examine sources of variation in these effects. The results of our meta-analysis showed that predation risk significantly decreased flower visitation rates (by 36%) and time spent on flowers (by 51%) by pollinators. The strength of the predator effects depended neither on predator taxa and foraging mode (sit-and-wait or active hunters) nor on pollinator lifestyle (social vs. solitary). However, predator effects differed among pollinator taxa: predator presence reduced flower visitation rates and time spent on flowers by Squamata, Lepidoptera and Hymenoptera, but not by Diptera. Furthermore, larger pollinators showed weaker responses to predation risk, probably because they are more difficult to capture. Presence of live crab spiders on flowers had weaker effects on pollinator behaviour than presence of dead or artificial crab spiders or other objects (e.g. dead bees, spheres), suggesting that predator crypsis may be effective to some extent. These results add to a growing consensus on the importance of considering both predator and pollinator characteristics from a community perspective.
Subject: Animals
Ants
Body Size
Flowers
Pollination
Predatory Behavior
Risk Factors
Spiders
Time Factors
Rights: aberto
Identifier DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0020689
Address: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21695187
Date Issue: 2011
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

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