Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/198209
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Zn Uptake, Physiological Response And Stress Attenuation In Mycorrhizal Jack Bean Growing In Soil With Increasing Zn Concentrations.
Author: Andrade, Sara A L
Gratão, Priscila L
Schiavinato, Marlene A
Silveira, Adriana P D
Azevedo, Ricardo A
Mazzafera, Paulo
Abstract: The influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) inoculation on Canavalia ensiformis growth, nutrient and Zn uptake, and on some physiological parameters in response to increasing soil Zn concentrations was studied. Treatments were applied in seven replicates in a 2 x 4 factorial design, consisting of the inoculation or not with the AMF Glomus etunicatum, and the addition of Zn to soil at the concentrations of 0, 100, 300 and 900 mg kg(-1). AMF inoculation enhanced the accumulation of Zn in tissues and promoted biomass yields and root nodulation. Mycorrhizal plants exhibited relative tolerance to Zn up to 300 mg kg(-1) without exhibiting visual symptoms of toxicity, in contrast to non-mycorrhizal plants which exhibited a significant growth reduction at the same soil Zn concentration. The highest concentration of Zn added to soil was highly toxic to the plants. Leaves of plants grown in high Zn concentration exhibited a Zn-induced proline accumulation and also an increase in soluble amino acid contents; however proline contents were lower in mycorrhizal jack beans. Plants in association or not with the AMF exhibited marked differences in the foliar soluble amino acid profile and composition in response to Zn addition to soil. In general, Zn induced oxidative stress which could be verified by increased lipid peroxidation rates and changes in catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase and superoxide dismutase activities. In summary, G. etunicatum was able to maintain an efficient symbiosis with jack bean plants in moderately contaminated Zn-soils, improving plant performance under those conditions, which is likely to be due to a combination of physiological and nutritional changes caused by the intimate relation between fungus and plant. The enhanced Zn uptake by AMF inoculated jack bean plants might be of interest for phytoremediation purposes.
Subject: Antioxidants
Biodegradation, Environmental
Canavalia
Mycorrhizae
Plant Leaves
Plant Proteins
Plant Roots
Soil Microbiology
Soil Pollutants
Zinc
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2009.02.008
Address: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19268339
Date Issue: 2009
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

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