Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/197860
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Extraction Of Genomic Dna From Paraffin-embedded Tissue Sections Of Human Fetuses Fixed And Stored In Formalin For Long Periods.
Author: Santos, Maria C L G
Saito, Cristiane P B
Line, Sergio R P
Abstract: The advent of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology has increased the interest in fetal specimens housed in anatomy museums, as they may represent a unique source of genetic material for the study of uncommon or rare pathological conditions such as congenital malformations, neoplastic processes and parasitic as well as other infectious diseases. The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of genomic DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue sections of human fetuses that have been maintained in formalin for several years. Fetal tissues were embedded in paraffin, and tissue sections were submitted to ethanol/xylene dewaxing, followed by DNA extraction with ammonium acetate. DNA fragments were amplified from DNA extracted from formalin-fixed tissue sections, but not from Bouin-fixed tissues (average yield of 13.7 microg/ml from 10 umbilical cord sections of 10 microm; A(260):A(280)=1.55,). The addition of bovine serum albumim increased the yield of PCR amplification. Genomic DNA can be reliably amplified from paraffin-embedded human fetal tissues that had been fixed in formalin during 19 years and used for microdissection studies. This simple, cost-effective, and non-laborious method should facilitate the molecular analysis of a large number of specimens fixed for long periods of time.
Subject: Dna
Fetus
Formaldehyde
Humans
Microdissection
Paraffin Embedding
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Tissue Fixation
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1016/j.prp.2008.04.005
Address: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18573618
Date Issue: 2008
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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