Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/197001
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: [factors Associated With Women's Failure To Submit To Pap Smears: A Population-based Study In Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil].
Author: Amorim, Vivian Mae Schmidt Lima
Barros, Marilisa Berti de Azevedo
César, Chester Luiz Galvão
Carandina, Luana
Goldbaum, Moisés
Abstract: This study analyzes the prevalence of non-submittal to Pap smears according to socioeconomic, demographic, and health-related behavioral variables in women 40 years or older in Campinas, São Paulo State. This was a cross-sectional population-based study with a sample of 290 women. Based on multivariate analysis, factors associated with not having Pap smears were: age (40-59 years), race/ethnicity (black or mixed-race), and schooling (< 4 years). The following reasons were cited for not having Pap smears: considered unnecessary (43.5%), embarrassment (28.1%), and barriers related to health services (13.7%). The Unified National Health System performed 43.2% of the reported Pap smears. Health services should promote more equitable access to the health care system and improve the quality of care for women, since Pap smears are an effective tool against cervical cancer. The study confirmed that women's failure to obtain Pap smears is associated with social and racial inequality, placing these women at increased risk of cervical cancer.
Subject: Adult
Brazil
Cross-sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility
Health Status
Humans
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Papanicolaou Test
Patient Acceptance Of Health Care
Poisson Distribution
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Vaginal Smears
Women's Health
Rights: aberto
Identifier DOI: 
Address: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17091170
Date Issue: 2006
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

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