Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/195331
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Growth Of Lignocellulosic-fermenting Fungi On Different Substrates Under Low Oxygenation Conditions.
Author: Pavarina, Erika C
Durrant, Lucia R
Abstract: Four soil fungi able to grow under low oxygenation conditions were selected and used in studies to determine the production of enzymes that promote the degradation of lignocellulosic materials. The capacity of these fungi to ferment such materials was also investigated. The fungi were grown in sugarcane bagasse and sawdust at final concentrations of 4 and 10%, as the carbon sources. The strains were cultivated under microaerophilic and combined conditions of oxygenation (aerobic followed by microaerophilic conditions). The results obtained with the basidiomycete specie, Trichocladium canadense, Geotrichum sp., and Fusarium sp. suggest that they prefer lower oxygen concentration for growth and enzyme production. Lignocellulolytic activities were detected in all strains but varied with the carbon source used. The highest levels of these activities were produced by the Basidiomycete specie and Fusarium sp. Ethanol and other nongaseous fermentation products were detected following high-performance liquid chromatography analysis using a supelcogel C-610H column, demonstrating the fermentative capability of these strains. In view of their ability to produce enzymes necessary for the breakdown of lignocellulosic materials and to utilize most of the degradation products for growth, these strains have a great potential for biotechnological application.
Subject: Biomass
Cellulose
Culture Media
Fermentation
Fungi
Fusarium
Geotrichum
Glycoside Hydrolases
Kinetics
Lignin
Oxygen Consumption
Substrate Specificity
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 
Address: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12018291
Date Issue: 2002
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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