Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/194872
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Tissue-specific Regulation Of Early Steps In Insulin Action In Septic Rats.
Author: Nunes, A L
Carvalheira, J B
Carvalho, C R
Brenelli, S L
Saad, M J
Abstract: Sepsis is known to induce insulin resistance, but the exact molecular mechanism involved is unknown. In the present study we have examined the levels and phosphorylation state of the insulin receptor and of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), as well as the association between IRS-1 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) in the liver and muscle of septic rats by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting with anti-insulin receptor, anti-IRS-1, anti-PI 3-kinase and anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. There were no changes in the insulin receptor concentration and phosphorylation levels in the liver and muscle of septic rats. IRS-1 protein levels were decreased by 40+/-3% (p < 0.01) in muscle but not in liver of septic rats. In samples previously immunoprecipitated with anti-IRS-1 antibody and blotted with antiphosphotyrosine antibody, the insulin-stimulated IRS-1 phosphorylation levels in the muscle of septic rats decreased by 38+/-5% (p < 0.01) and insulin-stimulated IRS-1 association with PI 3-kinase decreased by 44+/-7% in muscle (p < 0.01) but no changes were seen in liver. These data suggest that there is a tissue-specific regulation of early steps of insulin signal transduction in septic rats, and the changes observed in muscle may have a role in the insulin resistance of these animals.
Subject: Animals
Insulin
Insulin Receptor Substrate Proteins
Insulin Resistance
Male
Organ Specificity
Phosphoproteins
Phosphorylation
Rats
Receptor, Insulin
Sepsis
Signal Transduction
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 
Address: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11669454
Date Issue: 2001
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

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