Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/194280
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: [access To The Pediatric Ambulatory Service At A University Hospital].
Author: Franco, S C
Campos, G W
Abstract: In Brazil, one can verify an imbalance between the increase in the need for health care and its supply. The consolidation of the National Health System which recommends universality and equity in care, makes this issue important in the field of health service evaluation. Two pediatric services in a university hospital, one general and the other specialized are studied and compared in terms of their clients' access. Questionnaires were applied to 221 users of the general pediatrics outpatient departments of one of the specialties with a view to studying and comparing socioeconomic and several other variables related to the access to these and other health services. A high level of difficulty in the users' locomotion from local health services to the hospital was noted. Of the patients attended, 40% did not receive any kind of care before their arrival and were dependent exclusively on State-run health services. The clients of the specialty were different as regards several variables when compared to the users of the general outpatients' department. The fact that they are at a better socioeconomic level and are less dependent on State-run services brings out the social inequalities involved. Socioeconomic conditions, as well as organizational aspects of the service, are seen to be both causes and consequences of social inequality verified.
Subject: Adolescent
Brazil
Child
Child, Preschool
Health Services Accessibility
Hospitals, University
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Rights: aberto
Identifier DOI: 
Address: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9876426
Date Issue: 1998
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

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