Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/108243
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Lessons From The Epidemiological Surveillance Program, During The Influenza A (h1n1) Virus Epidemic, In A Reference University Hospital Of Southeastern Brazil [lições Aprendidas Pelo Programa De Vigilância Epidemiológica, Durante A Epidemia Pelo Vírus Da Influenza A (h1n1), Em Um Hospital Universitário Na Região Sudeste Do Brasil]
Author: Moretti M.L.
Sinkoc V.
Cardoso L.G.O.
de Camargo G.J.
Bachur L.F.
Hofling C.C.
Angerami R.
Trabasso P.
Garcia M.T.
Resende M.R.
Abstract: Introduction: The case definition of influenza-like illness (ILI) is a powerful epidemiological tool during influenza epidemics. Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the impact of two definitions used as epidemiological tools, in adults and children, during the influenza A H1N1 epidemic. Patients were included if they had upper respiratory samples tested for influenza by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction during two periods, using the ILI definition (coughing + temperature ≥ 38°C) in period 1, and the definition of severe acute respiratory infection (ARS) (coughing + temperature ≥ 38°C and dyspnoea) in period 2. Results: The study included 366 adults and 147 children, covering 243 cases of ILI and 270 cases of ARS. Laboratory confirmed cases of influenza were higher in adults (50%) than in children (21.6%) (p < 0.0001) and influenza infection was more prevalent in the ILI definition (53%) than ARS (24.4%) (p < 0.0001). Adults reported more chills and myalgia than children (p = 0.0001). Oseltamivir was administered in 58% and 46% of adults and children with influenza A H1N1, respectively. The influenza A H1N1 case fatality rate was 7% in adults and 8.3% in children. The mean time from onset of illness until antiviral administration was 4 days. Conclusions: The modification of ILI to ARS definition resulted in less accuracy in influenza diagnosis and did not improve the appropriate time and use of antiviral medication.
Editor: 
Rights: aberto
Identifier DOI: 10.1590/S0037-86822011005000048
Address: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-81455128923&partnerID=40&md5=b72e92ec71657bd5f25c3a4a396f1c1d
Date Issue: 2011
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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