Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/107116
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Bone Mineral Density In Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus And Its Relation To Estrogen Levels [densidade Mineral Ossea Em Pacientes Com Lupus Eritematoso Sistemico E Sua Relacao Com Niveis Estrogenicos]
Author: Coimbra I.B.
Costallat L.T.L.
Abstract: Objectives: 1) To evaluate bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); 2) to determine the role of corticosteroids and cytotoxic drugs; 3) to assess the effect of estrogen on BMD in SLE. Patients and methods: BMD (DEXA) at lumbar vertebrae (L2-L4) and at femoral neck in 60 pre-menopausal SLE patients and in 64 controls, and concentrations of estradiol were measured. Age, age at disease onset, body mass index (BMI), time of disease, disease activity (SLEDAI), prednisone dose at the evaluation, total cumulative and cumulative prednisone dose in the last year and cytotoxic drugs were also assessed. Results: Mean plasmatic estradiol was 175.98 pg/ml in patients and 149.9 in controls. BMD was lower in patients than in controls (p < 0.0001). The mean current, cumulative, and last year prednisone doses were respectively 19.17 mg/d, 28. 78 g, and 5.33 g. There was no association between corticosteroids or the cytotoxic drug used and bone loss (BL). The serum concentration of estradiol did not influence the bone mass loss. The body mass index and age at the disease onset showed influence on BMD at L2. Conclusion: BMD was significantly lower in SLE patients but not related to CE or to other drugs; the estradiol had no effect on BMD. Low bone mass index interacting with early onset of disease might influence the probability of loss of bone mass.
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Rights: fechado
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Address: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033804955&partnerID=40&md5=e921c658795b0355b1c5b69f6aeb273e
Date Issue: 2000
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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