Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/101136
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Genetic And Environmental Influences On Atonic Immune Response In Early Life
Author: Lopez N.
De Barros-Mazon S.
Dos Santos Vilela M.M.
Silva C.M.
Ribeiro J.D.
Abstract: The purpose of our study was to carry out a prospective follow-up of 114 newborns at term (including three pairs of twins), regarding clinical manifestations for atopy during the first year of life. Their IgE levels in cord blood samples, at 3 6 9 and 12 months of age were measured and the influence of race, sex, breast-feeding, maternal smoking, family income, month of birth, family history and personal manifestations of atopic disease were evaluated. Total serum immunoglobulin E was quantified by microparticle enzyme immunoassay (MEIA). The study group consisted of 60 (53) male neonates, 67 (59) Caucasians and 47 (41) blacks. In the clinical follow-up, 32 (28.1) infants developed obvious atopic disease: 29 infants presented recurrent wheezing, two had cow's milk allergy and one had atopic dermatitis. Probable atopic disease developed in 12 (10.5) infants, whereas 70 (61.4) infants showed no manifestations. Cord blood IgE levels in infants with obvious atopic disease was higher when compared to those without (p = 0.024), with 70.97 sensitivity and 46.2 specificity. IgE levels were also significantly different up to 12 months in these groups (p = 0.0001), when the sensitivity was 82.1 and the specificity 54.1. At this age, the IgE levels were higher in infants with obvious atopy than nonatopic disease in relation to male sex (p = 0.015), black race (p = 0.009), breast-feeding for less than 6 months (p = 0.011) and when the family income was less than three times the minimum wage (about US 300) (p = 0.006). There was no association between IgE levels and family history of atopy. We concluded that immune response for atopy was in a large degree influenced by environmental factors and serum IgE at 12 months was a good marker for identifying infants with risk of atopic disease in early life.
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Rights: fechado
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Address: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-0342980242&partnerID=40&md5=251a34f3848111bd24a9f6b5c30c0996
Date Issue: 1999
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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