Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/101016
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Myocardial Contractile Response To An Oral Glucose Load In Normal Subjects Evaluated By Echocardiography.
Author: Souza M.L.
Leme Jr. C.A.
Cavicchio J.R.
Saad M.J.
Gontijo J.A.
Abstract: There is a paucity of experimental data on the actual mechanism of insulin-induced changes on the myocardial function. In the present study we investigated the myocardial contractile, response to an oral glucose load using echocardiography. Fifteen healthy volunteers were studied after overnight fast and 150 minutes after the oral load of 75 g glucose. Oral glucose load caused an increase in plasma glucose and insulin levels, which was accompanied by a significant increase in left ventricular shortening (from 35.2 +/- 0.7% at baseline, to 38.5 +/- 0.6% and 39 +/- 0.9% at 30 and 60 minutes post glucose load, respectively [P < 0.05 vs baseline]; ejection fraction rose from 0.73% +/- 0.01 to 0.77% +/- 0.01 (P < 0.05); pressure rate product increased from 7.29 +/- 0.2 to 8.31 +/- 0.3 mmHg x beats per min (P < 0.007) and heart rate enhanced from 68.3 +/- 1.9 to 74 +/- 1.6 (P < 0.034) and 75.3 +/- 1.5 beats per min (P < 0.008) at 60 and 90 minutes after glucose, respectively. Meanwhile, mean arterial pressure decreased significantly (10 +/- 1.5%, P < 0.018) when compared to basal values. These results indicate a significant change in the myocardial contractile response to an oral glucose load, probably related to baroreceptor reflex response as well as an overridden by a potent vasodilator action of insulin. Nevertheless, we could not rule out that the cardiac effects may also be due an insulin-induced sympathetic activation or a direct myocardial effect.
Editor: 
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 
Address: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033287501&partnerID=40&md5=fd448413bbef7b70a0a74a989c386f24
Date Issue: 1999
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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