Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/100604
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Mass Transfer And Diffusion Coefficient Determination In The Wet And Dry Salting Of Meat
Author: Sabadini E.
Carvalho Jr. B.C.
Sobral P.J.D.A.
Hubinger M.D.
Abstract: Dehyrated salted meat is widely used in Brazil as a very important source of animal protein. The main objective of this kind of processing is water removal, initially by osmotic pressure changes and then by drying, resulting in a product with intermediate moisture levels. In this work, mass transfer and salt diffusion in pieces of meat submitted to wet and dry salting were studied. Slabs of beed m. trapezius with an infinite plate geometry were dalted in a NaCL saturated solution or in a dry salt bed, at two temperatures (10 and 20°C) and different time exposures (120 min and 96 hours). Equilibration studies were extended up to six days. It was observed that water loss increased with salt uptake, for increasing periods of times. At 20°C the moisture loss was highier than it was at 10°C in both salting processes. On the other hand, the kinetics of salt uptake and moisture loss were of greater importance in the process of dry salting than in that of wet salting. The salt diffusion coefficient for wet salting was 0.26 × 10-10 m2/s at 20°C and 0.25 × 10-10 m2/s at 10°C and for the dry salting the values ewre 19.37 × 10-10 m2/s at 20°C and 17.21 × 10-10 m2/s at 10°C.Dehydrated salted meat is widely used in Brazil as a very important source of animal protein. The main objective of this kind of processing is water removal, initially by osmotic pressure changes and then by drying, resulting in a product with intermediate moisture levels. In this work, mass transfer and salt diffusion in pieces of meat submitted to wet and dry salting were studied. Slabs of beef m. trapezius with an infinite plate geometry were salted in a NaCl saturated solution or in a dry salt bed, at two temperatures (10 and 20 °C) and different time exposures (120 min and 96 hours). Equilibration studies were extended up to six days. It was observed that water loss increased with salt uptake, for increasing periods of times. At 20 °C the moisture loss was higher than it was at 10 °C in both salting processes. On the other hand, the kinetics of salt uptake and moisture loss were of greater importance in the process of dry salting than in that of wet salting. The salt diffusion coefficient for wet salting was 0.26×10-10 m2/s at 20 °C and 0.25×10-10 m2/s at 10 °C and for the dry salting the values were 19.37×10-10 m2/s at 20 °C and 17.21×10-10 m2/s at 10 °C.
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Rights: fechado
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Address: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032193450&partnerID=40&md5=0d75efc384f9894182778cae7b0cf3ad
Date Issue: 1998
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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